Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (officially Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus) (station code: CSTM (mainline)[3]/ST (suburban)), also known by its former name Victoria Terminus (station code: BBVT/VT[4]), is a historic terminal train station and UNESCO World Heritage Site in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

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Kamathipura (also spelled Kamthipuram) [1] is a neighbourhood in Mumbai, India. It was first settled after 1795 with the construction of causeways that connected the erstwhile seven islands of Mumbai. Initially known as Lal Bazaar, it got its name from the Kamathis (workers) of other areas of the country, who were labourers on construction sites. Due to tough police crackdown, in the late 1990s with the rise of AIDS and government’s redevelopment policy that helped sex workers to move out of the profession and subsequently out of Kamathipura, the number of sex workers in the area has dwindled.[2] In 1992, Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) recorded there were 45,000 sex workers here which was reduced to 1,600 in 2009[1] and 500 in 2018.[3] Many sex workers have migrated to other areas in Maharashtra with real estate developers taking over the high-priced real estate. In 2018 the Maharashtra government sought tenders to demolish and redevelop the area.[3]
Dharavi is a locality in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India, considered to be one of Asia’s largest slums.[1][2] Dharavi has an area of just over 2.1 square kilometres (0.81 sq mi; 520 acres)[3] and a population of about 1,000,000. With a population density of over 277,136/km2 (717,780/sq mi), Dharavi is one of the most densely populated areas in the world.
The Dharavi slum was founded in 1884 during the British colonial era, and grew because the expulsion of factories and residents from the peninsular city centre by the colonial government and from the migration of rural Indians into urban Mumbai. For this reason, Dharavi is currently a highly diverse settlement religiously and ethnically.[4]

Dharavi has an active informal economy in which numerous household enterprises employ many of the slum residents[5]—leather, textiles and pottery products are among the goods made inside Dharavi. The total annual turnover has been estimated at over US$1 billion.[6]

Dharavi has suffered from many epidemics and other disasters, including a widespread plague in 1896 which killed over half of the population of Mumbai.[7] Sanitation in the slums remains poor.[8]

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